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The public expression of many sharply divergent points of view is fundamental both to our democracy and to our mission as a university. We offer this online space to anyone who wants to join the conversation about free speech in all its diverse forms.

Please read our comment policies before you start a conversation or join one on this page. You can also participate by up/down voting comments that you agree/disagree with. Note that all comments are moderated and will only be published if they follow the ground rules mentioned in our comment policies. We will endeavor to get all comments posted within 48 hours, except during weekends or holidays.

5 comments on free speech

  1. I found this comment section instead marked “dialogue” for some odd reason, hard to locate. In any case, please answer this question: Why doesn’t Berkeley administration strictly enforce UC oath to uphold Constitution of US & California and dismiss faculty engaged in Anti-American activities designed to overthrow Constitutionally elected President and violently suppress civil rights of Trump supporters?

    (5)
  2. The free speech FAQ conflates the First Amendment rights with harassment in a way that is confusing if not misleading. It is absolutely not illegal for anyone to make disparaging remarks related to race, religion, sexual origin, or any other protected class. The FAQ makes an ambiguous reference to the “categories above” which actually referred to harassment, not to free speech. This should be clarified.

    (0)
  3. God doesn’t give rights and freedoms. Free speech is not some idea beyond the human realm. Let’s bring things down to reality, shall we? Forget the Constitution, forget your court cases, forget it all. Humans are real, we have a biological tendency to be social and seem to be positively responsive to autonomy. Let us also note that in social animal groups, the one who acts counter to the groups’ interest or to the interest of any individual of the group, they get set straight. Humans too, react when one seems to threaten autonomy. Let this be the basis of any “rights” and “freedoms.” We want to be free to our own choices in matters and we will defend this. If someone threatens others with violent ideologies and genocidal remarks, then, in accordance to the previously discussed, do we set them straight in order to maintain our autonomy, or do we reify and fetishize the idea of maintaining autonomy, perverting ourselves to believe defending the transgressor to be somehow defending ourselves? Do we go on to invite these very people into our homes, knowing very well that others have not fallen for this delusion, understanding what is real, and willing to take drastic action to defend their autonomy?

    UC Berkeley, you disappoint your people. You bring destruction to the campus and city knowingly, just to virtue-signal. Shame on you.

    (-3)
  4. The last time we let Nazis and white nationalists gain ground, we ended up with extermination camps. The last time we let Nazis do how they please, they started to gain ground. I am a transgender woman, and these people want me dead. You can claim that Nazis have as much a right to free speech as anyone, but the fact of the matter is that this isn’t a game to anyone but the most privileged people in our society. They want LGBT people dead, they want people of color dead, and they want *you*, the people who claim to represent free speech dead. Fun fact: free speech in a fascist state means a bullet to the head. This isn’t an abstraction, this is the historical truth. And if they get what they want, they won’t care that you helped them get it.

    (-9)
    • So you are saying that Nazism is such an amazing ideology that if it isn’t violently opposed it will convert everybody? If it is so horrible, why can’t you just shoot it down in logical debate in front of everybody?

      (0)

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The ideas expressed on this page are not necessarily those of the University; they are not official, not predictable, and not of one mind. In keeping with the spirit of the Free Speech Movement, the thoughts here are those of the individual authors.

We invite you to join the conversation. The ground rules for commenting, drawn from the UC Berkeley Principles of Community, are as follows:

All comments are moderated and will be published if they follow the ground rules mentioned above.

We will endeavor to get all comments posted within 48 hours, except during weekends or holidays. 

The ideas expressed on this page are not necessarily those of the University; they are not official, not predictable, and not of one mind. In keeping with the spirit of the Free Speech Movement, the thoughts here are those of the individual authors.

We invite you to join the conversation. The ground rules for commenting, drawn from the UC Berkeley Principles of Community, are as follows:

All comments are moderated and will be published if they follow the ground rules mentioned above.

We will endeavor to get all comments posted within 48 hours, except during weekends or holidays. 

The ideas expressed on this page are not necessarily those of the University; they are not official, not predictable, and not of one mind. In keeping with the spirit of the Free Speech Movement, the thoughts here are those of the individual authors.

We invite you to join the conversation. The ground rules for commenting, drawn from the UC Berkeley Principles of Community, are as follows:

All comments are moderated and will be published if they follow the ground rules mentioned above.

We will endeavor to get all comments posted within 48 hours, except during weekends or holidays.